.cancerresearch

The Big picture…

The Big Picture

Australian Cancer Research Foundation

.CANCERRESEARCH is a collaborative initiative facilitated by the Australian Cancer Research Foundation. Its focus is to bring together news, information, and leading opinion on cancer treatment, prevention, diagnosis and cure. We want you to be a part of the .CANCERRESEARCH community...

Please click here to learn more.

Home.

Cancer
Research

HOME.CANCERRESEARCH

Explore our home site for an idea of what .CANCERRESEARCH has to offer.

> Information on different types of cancer
> Cancer research endeavours of the past and near future
> Ways you can get involved

Visit our home site home.cancerresearch

You Are Here
 
  • ARMING THE IMMUNE SYSTEM TO HELP FIGHT CANCER
    Checkpoint blockade and adoptive immunotherapy are two examples of the fourth and newest pillar of cancer therapy, the first such advance in 50 years.
  • WHAT IS CANCER?
    Find out more about cancer
  • 10TH ANNIVERSARY OF WORLD’S FIRST HPV VACCINE
    Ten years ago, the first Human Papillomavirus (HPV) immunisation was administered in Australia. Here Professor Ian Frazer talks about the development of the vaccine and how it should lead to the global elimination of new cervical and other HPV associated cancers by 2050.
  • 2016 ACRF CANCER RESEARCH GRANTS ANNOUNCED
    Each year, ACRF challenges the Australian cancer research community to propose projects that are bold and have potential to make a significant impact on cancer prevention, detection and treatment.
  • LET'S END CANCER TOGETHER
    The donations we receive fund research in to prevention, diagnosis and treatment of all types of cancer. Your generosity funds technology to fast-track discoveries that have the power to change the lives of cancer patients and their families.

Cancer by the Numbers

Cancer has become the number one cause of death globally. Our mission is to make these stats history and put an end to cancer for good.

people affected

0
new cancer cases
worldwide per year

survival rate improvement

0%
of cancers
can be prevented

cause of death globally

0
cancer deaths
globally

Types of Cancer

 

Lung cancer is one of the five most commonly diagnosed cancers in Australia, and causes more deaths than any other type of cancer. There are two types of lung cancer: small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer, with the latter being the more common form of the disease.

Although childhood cancers are rare compared with cancer in adults, they remain the leading cause of disease-related death in people aged 1 to 15 years. Thanks to research, survival rates for childhood cancers have significantly improved over the last few decades.

Skin cancer is a disease in which cancer cells form in the tissues of the skin. Skin cancers are often classified into two groups: melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers, the latter being less likely to spread throughout the body.

Bowel cancer, also called colorectal cancer, begins when cells that line the colon or rectum in the bowel (large intestine) change and begin to grow out of control, forming a tumour. If detected early, bowel cancer is considered one of the most treatable types of cancers.

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer type in women. It forms in tissues of the breast, and it can occur at any age. Thanks to research, survival rates for breast cancer are among the most improved of all types of cancer.

Prostate cancer develops in the prostate gland below the bladder. This gland is responsible for making and storing seminal fluid. Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men.

There are many types of cancer affecting different cells or organs in the body. Sustained research is helping to reduce both incidence and mortality rates for all of these cancer types by finding better ways to detect, manage and treat the disease. View a list of cancer types, located on the Australian Cancer Research Foundation website.

Latest News

 
Subscribe for updates